Fordham PhD becomes Journal Editor

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Paul Thifault (PhD, Early American, 2012), who is an assistant professor at Springfield College, has recently been selected as Co-Editor of Resources for American Literary Study (Penn State University Press). Founded in 1971, RALS is a peer-reviewed journal of archival and bibliographical scholarship covering all periods of American literature. Under the new editorship of Thifault and Nancy Sweet (Cal State Sacramento), the journal will move from an annual to a biannual publication and expand its coverage to include the digital humanities and literary pedagogies.

“It’s an exciting time for archival and bibliographical research in American literature,” says Thifault, “as our very notions of the archive, the book, and what counts as ‘American literature’ are all in flux.” While featuring the work of early-career and senior scholars, RALS also welcomes graduate student submissions because, as Thifault notes, “the nature of orals-prep and proposal writing makes grad students aware of patterns and gaps in critical bibliography, not to mention that so many graduate students now spend fellowship time in the archives, digitally and physically.”

The journal’s “Prospects” essays, which forecast future developments in the scholarly study of major authors, are also an excellent resource for students in the process of devising thesis or dissertation topics.

For inquiries, send an email to ethifault@springfieldcollege.edu

For submissions, visit http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_rals.html

Or follow RALS on Twitter @ForLiterary

More fabulous job news, Ray Dademo at Monmouth University

In September, Ray Dademo, an English major and alum (FCLC’07), will begin a tenure-track position at Monmouth University, where he has taught composition as an adjunct for several years.  In 2012, Ray completed his MFA in Creative Writing (Nonfiction) at Columba University with a concentration on the principles of Composition and Rhetoric, one of his academic interests. 

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     Recently, at the Northeast Modern Language Association conference Ray presented “Progressive Pedagogy: Long-term Academic Competence from the Composition Class.”  An article Ray did for the CEA Critic entitled “Narrating the Moviegoing Experience: Reframing Film for First Year Composition,” led to a presentation with the same name at the College English Association meeting. https://muse.jhu.edu/article/678900

     Ray has also taught composition at Montclair State University and Rutgers University and plans to pursue a Ph.D.

Henna Messina, Fordham University English major, earns lecturer position in English at Clemson University

 Henna Messina, an English major who graduated from Fordham in 2006, and completed her Ph.D this year at the University of Georgia, has just started a job as a lecturer in English at Clemson University.    Below is what I copied and pasted from her grad. assistant page, still up, at Georgia.  Elizabeth Stone  "Henna is a sixth-year PhD candidate specializing in eighteenth and nineteenth-century British Literature. Her dissertation is titled "Dislocated Women: Disinheritance, Mobility and Domestic Space in British Fiction (1753-1855)" and explores the creation of a literary female subjectivity through the pressures of materiality and disinheritance in the novels of Frances Burney, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, and Elizabeth Gaskell.  Henna's article, "Fanny Price's Domestic Assemblages in Austen's  Mansfield Park ," has appeared in the journal  Persuasions.  Her article "Bodily Matters: Creative Agency in Frances Burney's Life Writing" is forthcoming in  Women's Writing.  She has recently presented on gift economy in  Mansfield Park  at the 2017 meeting of the  American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies  and domestic politics in Frances Burney's  Cecilia  at the 2016 meeting of the  Frances Burney Society .   Education:   BA in English, Fordham University, 2006  MA in British Literature, CUNY Hunter College, 2010

Henna Messina, an English major who graduated from Fordham in 2006, and completed her Ph.D this year at the University of Georgia, has just started a job as a lecturer in English at Clemson University.  

Below is what I copied and pasted from her grad. assistant page, still up, at Georgia.

Elizabeth Stone

"Henna is a sixth-year PhD candidate specializing in eighteenth and nineteenth-century British Literature. Her dissertation is titled "Dislocated Women: Disinheritance, Mobility and Domestic Space in British Fiction (1753-1855)" and explores the creation of a literary female subjectivity through the pressures of materiality and disinheritance in the novels of Frances Burney, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, and Elizabeth Gaskell.

Henna's article, "Fanny Price's Domestic Assemblages in Austen's Mansfield Park," has appeared in the journal Persuasions. Her article "Bodily Matters: Creative Agency in Frances Burney's Life Writing" is forthcoming in Women's Writing. She has recently presented on gift economy in Mansfield Park at the 2017 meeting of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and domestic politics in Frances Burney's Cecilia at the 2016 meeting of the Frances Burney Society.

Education:

BA in English, Fordham University, 2006

MA in British Literature, CUNY Hunter College, 2010

Will Fenton named Creative Director of Major Grant

Doctoral candidate Will Fenton will serve as the creative director of a multi-year project “Redrawing History: Indigenous Perspectives on Colonial America,” supported by a $300,000 grant that was recently awarded to the Library Company of Philadelphia by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage. This project builds on Fenton’s recent fellowship at the Library Company where he conducted research and designed the digital humanities project Digital Paxton, which increases accessibility to and awareness of the 1764 Paxton pamphlet war.

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At the center of “Redrawing History” will be an educational graphic novel and public exhibition at the Library Company. Fenton has assembled an advisory board with leaders from the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the Lenape Center, the Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of the American Indian, and the McNeil Center for Early American Studies to support a Native American writer (Lee Francis), artist (Weshoyot Alvitre), and publisher (Native Realities Press) as they reinterpret the Paxton massacre of 1763 from the perspective of the Conestoga. The published book will be freely distributed to the public and to all 567 federally-recognized tribes. Graphic art will be made publicly accessible via Digital Paxton and the Digital Public Library of America.

 

Alongside the publication of the graphic novel, the project will feature a national educators’ summer institute co-sponsored by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, a tour and site visit at the Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of the American Indian, and a public exhibition and symposium at the Library Company of Philadelphia. All new curricular and archival resources will be made publicly accessible through Digital Paxton.

 

To learn more about the project, see The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage’s press release.

 

 

 

Christina Elia, Published in The Tishman Review

Congratulations to Christina Elia on the publication of her autobiographical essay, “Avos” that appeared in The Tishman Review, April 2018. The essay appears on pages 86 to 90. 

Christina is a Fordham University student who is pursuing her BA in Art History and Communications. She writes about topics ranging from arts and culture to practical tips and how-to advice. She has also been published on sites such as Odessy.com and currently writes for Select Magazine

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Doctoral Student Danielle Sottosanti Represents Fordham at the IUDC Doctoral Consortium

Congratulations to graduate student, Danielle Sottosanti, for being chosen to deliver a portion of her Doctoral research at New York City’s Medieval Inter-University Doctoral Consortium. The Doctoral Consortium, which draws from faculty and graduate students from CUNY – Brooklyn College, CUNY – Graduate Center, Columbia, Fordham, NYU, Princeton, Rutgers, SUNY - Stony Brook, and others, showcases the research of top students in and around New York City. Danielle’s paper, “The Romance of Crossover: Why Now is the Time for Broader Study of Late-Medieval Religious Conversion,” formed part of a session entitled “Finding New Paths,” chaired by Professor Steven Kruger of CUNY – Graduate Center. The Consortium was hosted this year by NYU on 27 April 2018. The attached image from the Auchinleck MS imagines religious conversion in the enigmatic, medieval romance, "The King of Tars," where the convert's skin color changes once he is baptized. Please join the Fordham community in congratulating Danielle for a job well done!

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Fordham Film Group Welcomes Award-Winning Director Ian Olds

 Documenting America’s Wars: A Conversation With Ian Olds saw a packed room last Wednesday, April 25, when the Fordham Film Group welcomed award-winning filmmaker Ian Olds to campus for a lecture followed by lively discussion. The event was a tremendous success, with over 30 attendees filling the room at Fordham’s law school. Attendees included graduate students, undergraduates, veterans, officers from the Fordham ROTC and VA, and visitors to Fordham. Olds co-directed the “grunt’s-eye view” documentary Occupation: Dreamland (2005), winner of the 2006 Independent Spirit Award, and directed Fixer: The Taking of Ajmal Naqshbandi (2009), the chronicle of an Afghan journalist/interpreter during the War in Afghanistan, which earned Olds Best New Documentary Filmmaker at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival. At the talk on Wednesday, he discussed his personal journey and craft as a war documentarian, his experience covering Iraq and Afghanistan, and his broader thinking about the art and politics of documentary filmmaking and representing armed conflict in film narrative. The packed room represented an unconventional coming together of different groups and demographics at Fordham, with opportunities for dialogue during the Q&A session and the reception after Olds’ talk. The event was a valuable starting point of discussion about the interaction between soldiers and embedded journalists downrange, the portrayal of combat and occupation through film, and the perspectives of veterans and civilians on the experience of combat and the military as a whole. In particular, the enthusiastic interactions between members of the Fordham student body and the veterans’ communities at Fordham exemplified diverse, thoughtful discussion between students, civilians, and veterans. Olds’ visit created a bridge of community between a noted filmmaker and the Fordham Film Group, which has been a charter group for graduate students since 2014. Opening the event to the larger Fordham community offered an exciting opportunity for interdepartmental dialogue about film scholarship, the ethics and politics of war, the experience of combat for veterans and civilians, and the craft of storytelling. The event was sponsored by the Fordham GSA, GEA, and English Department. We would like to thank these groups for their support, and we look forward to continuing our future work with the members and organizations of the Fordham community that were so important to facilitating and supporting this exciting discussion. The Film Group’s cross-disciplinary, bi-annual gatherings are open to all graduate students with an interest in cinema. The group’s next screening will be in Fall 2018. Stay tuned! For more information please email Ellis Light (elight1@fordham.edu) or Caitlin Cawley (ccawley@fordham.edu).

Documenting America’s Wars: A Conversation With Ian Olds saw a packed room last Wednesday, April 25, when the Fordham Film Group welcomed award-winning filmmaker Ian Olds to campus for a lecture followed by lively discussion. The event was a tremendous success, with over 30 attendees filling the room at Fordham’s law school. Attendees included graduate students, undergraduates, veterans, officers from the Fordham ROTC and VA, and visitors to Fordham. Olds co-directed the “grunt’s-eye view” documentary Occupation: Dreamland (2005), winner of the 2006 Independent Spirit Award, and directed Fixer: The Taking of Ajmal Naqshbandi (2009), the chronicle of an Afghan journalist/interpreter during the War in Afghanistan, which earned Olds Best New Documentary Filmmaker at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival. At the talk on Wednesday, he discussed his personal journey and craft as a war documentarian, his experience covering Iraq and Afghanistan, and his broader thinking about the art and politics of documentary filmmaking and representing armed conflict in film narrative. The packed room represented an unconventional coming together of different groups and demographics at Fordham, with opportunities for dialogue during the Q&A session and the reception after Olds’ talk. The event was a valuable starting point of discussion about the interaction between soldiers and embedded journalists downrange, the portrayal of combat and occupation through film, and the perspectives of veterans and civilians on the experience of combat and the military as a whole. In particular, the enthusiastic interactions between members of the Fordham student body and the veterans’ communities at Fordham exemplified diverse, thoughtful discussion between students, civilians, and veterans. Olds’ visit created a bridge of community between a noted filmmaker and the Fordham Film Group, which has been a charter group for graduate students since 2014. Opening the event to the larger Fordham community offered an exciting opportunity for interdepartmental dialogue about film scholarship, the ethics and politics of war, the experience of combat for veterans and civilians, and the craft of storytelling. The event was sponsored by the Fordham GSA, GEA, and English Department. We would like to thank these groups for their support, and we look forward to continuing our future work with the members and organizations of the Fordham community that were so important to facilitating and supporting this exciting discussion. The Film Group’s cross-disciplinary, bi-annual gatherings are open to all graduate students with an interest in cinema. The group’s next screening will be in Fall 2018. Stay tuned! For more information please email Ellis Light (elight1@fordham.edu) or Caitlin Cawley (ccawley@fordham.edu).